Critical essays american literature series

When examining  Fahrenheit 451  as a piece of dystopian fiction, a definition for the term "dystopia" is required.  Dystopia  is often used as an antonym of "utopia," a perfect world often imagined existing in the future. A dystopia, therefore, is a terrible place. You may find it more helpful (and also more accurate) to conceive a dystopian literary tradition, a literary tradition that's created worlds containing reactions against certain ominous social trends and therefore imagines a disastrous future if these trends are not reversed. Most commonly cited as the model of a twentieth-century dystopian novel is Yevgeny Zamiatin's  We  (1924), which envisions an oppressive but stable social order accomplished only through the complete effacement of the individual.  We , which may more properly be called an anti-utopian work rather than a dystopian work, is often cited as the precursor of George Orwell's  1984  (1948), a nightmarish vision of a totalitarian world of the future, similar to one portrayed in  We , in which terrorist force maintains order.

Critical essays american literature series

critical essays american literature series

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