Charlie and the chocolate factory essay

Charlie and Mike Teavee are the last ones left. Wonka takes them in a special glass elevator that can move sideways as well as up and down, and they head to the Television Chocolate room, where Wonka takes giant bars of chocolate and sends them by television so that they can be taken from the television screen on the other side. Mike decides that he will be the first person ever to be sent by television, and before Wonka can stop him he flips the switch to send himself, becoming tiny on the other side. The Oompa-Loompas take Mike and his parents to the taffy puller so Mike can be stretched out to normal size, and sing a song that recommends giving your children books instead of letting them watch television.

Charlie is congratulated as the only remaining child and the winner of the grand prize, Wonka's heir to the factory. Unfortunately, Wonka stipulates that Charlie's family has to stay behind ergo Charlie rejects the offer. Charlie learns that Wonka had a troubled past with his father, Wilbur Wonka; a dentist. Willy was forbidden from eating candy of any type or quantity and torture device-like braces affixed to his teeth. But once Willy got a taste, he wanted to become a confectioner, against his father's wishes and he left home to follow his dream. Wonka later returned to find his father and home completely gone. Wonka's candies are selling poorly and comes to associate his unhappiness with the sorry financial state of his company, so he makes an effort to find Charlie who locates Wilbur. When they visit, it appears that despite his strict avoidance of candy, the dentist has followed Willy's success and they reconcile. Wonka allows Charlie's family to move into the factory while he and Charlie plan new product lines to produce.

His dentist father, Dr. Wilbur Wonka  was overbearing in his attempts to protect his son's teeth, that he burned any candies that Willy has in the fireplace. This caused Willy to run away from his home to be a chocolatier, only to miss his train and find that his house is gone. His resulting dislike for his father has affected him to the extent of him suffering flashbacks of his childhood, stuttering and panicking whenever he has to even say the first syllable of the word "parents", and his views of having a family to be a hindrance to a chocolatier's creative freedom.

Dahl regularly employs absurd language and ideas. Some of these absurdities are hair-growing candy for children, square candies that look ’round, and edible pillows. All of these demand a suspension of disbelief from the reader. In the story, the children who cannot suspend their disbelief fall into disfavor with Mr. Wonka. By being able to suspend disbelief, the reader can align himself with Mr. Wonka and Charlie. A reader might agree with Mike Teavee that children do not need to worry about going bald. But the same reader can enjoy watching Mr. Wonka dismiss Mike and champion Charlie. These absurdities also entertain young readers and push their intellectual capacities.

Charlie and the chocolate factory essay

charlie and the chocolate factory essay

Dahl regularly employs absurd language and ideas. Some of these absurdities are hair-growing candy for children, square candies that look ’round, and edible pillows. All of these demand a suspension of disbelief from the reader. In the story, the children who cannot suspend their disbelief fall into disfavor with Mr. Wonka. By being able to suspend disbelief, the reader can align himself with Mr. Wonka and Charlie. A reader might agree with Mike Teavee that children do not need to worry about going bald. But the same reader can enjoy watching Mr. Wonka dismiss Mike and champion Charlie. These absurdities also entertain young readers and push their intellectual capacities.

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